Rules of the Formatting Game


First a word from our sponsor:

Check out my Script Consultation Services at http://ow.ly/HPxKE. I offer several types of service. Testimonials can be found at the blog entry.

Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay?  Check out the second edition of my screenwriting book, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader published on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GD1XP9Y

Finally, I have published a collection of three of my plays, 3 Plays, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08478DBXF as well as two collections of short stories, The Starving Artists and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FS91CKJ and The Five Corporations and the One True Church and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07KY5Z3CF.

 

The next in my blog entries on screenwriting and film will be about common formatting mistakes I still see people make. I am surprised at some of these, that they are still committed on such a regular basis. But it still happens.

 

Probably most of you already know these rules. But it never hurts to have a refresher course. Continue reading

Happy Valentine’s Day–A Look at Rom Coms


First a word from our sponsor:

Check out my Script Consultation Services at http://ow.ly/HPxKE. I offer several types of service. Testimonials can be found at the blog entry.

Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay?  Check out the second edition of my screenwriting book, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader published on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GD1XP9Y

Finally, I have published a collection of three of my plays, 3 Plays, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08478DBXF as well as two collections of short stories, The Starving Artists and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FS91CKJ and The Five Corporations and the One True Church and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07KY5Z3CF.

 

Since today is Valentine’s Day, I thought I would share an essay that I wrote for my blog and that is included in my screenwriting book More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader. The subject is romantic comedies (or rom coms as they are called in the industry) and my take on the genre as a whole; a history of it and some difficulties I find in reading them for screenplays contests, production company, etc.

 

I first published it some time ago, but I think it still has something to say. And it is, in many ways, a personal take on the genre.

 

At any rate, enjoy.

 

I have heard, over and over again (and then over and over again, and then over and, well, anyway) three observations about Rom Coms the last few years.

 

The First is that they are very hard to write.  The Second is that they make a lot of money.  The Third is that everyone is looking for one to produce because they make a lot of money. Continue reading

Renaissance: The Films of South Korea


 

First a word from our sponsor:

Check out my Script Consultation Services at http://ow.ly/HPxKE. I offer several types of service. Testimonials can be found at the blog entry.

Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay?  Check out the second edition of my screenwriting book, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader published on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GD1XP9Y

Finally, I have published a collection of three of my plays, 3 Plays, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08478DBXF as well as two collections of short stories, The Starving Artists and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FS91CKJ and The Five Corporations and the One True Church and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07KY5Z3CF.

 

I have been an admirer of South Korean films for a number of years now, constantly touting them as, along with the output from Romania, the most interesting films being made today, far more interesting more often than not, in comparison to American films.

 

Now that Parasite has won best picture at the Academy Awards, I thought I would list my favorite South Korean filmmakers and their films. For those who are not as aware of the movies being made there, this might hopefully serve as somewhat of a primer or introduction. I certainly am not the expert others are, but still, I think my list is probably pretty decent. Continue reading

What’s In A Name: Choosing Names for Characters


First a word from our sponsor:

Check out my Script Consultation Services at http://ow.ly/HPxKE. I offer several types of service. Testimonials can be found at the blog entry.

Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay?  Check out the second edition of my screenwriting book, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader published on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GD1XP9Y

Finally, I have published a collection of three of my plays, 3 Plays, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08478DBXF as well as two collections of short stories, The Starving Artists and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FS91CKJ and The Five Corporations and the One True Church and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07KY5Z3CF.

 

 

The next of my series in occasional posts on screenwriting will be a bit more fun, I hope. It’s about names and how one chooses names for characters. What are some of your favorite names in film and why do you think they were chosen?

 

This is not a how to or you must do this post. There have been various ways names have been chosen by various authors. Some are specifically chosen to make some sort of comment on the characters (Jarndyce and Jarndyce, anyone, or Eliza Doolittle). But some authors pull names out of phone books or name them after their favorite short stop baseball players. In the end, the choice is yours.

 

I tend to choose names that comment to some degree on the character. It sometimes works, sometimes doesn’t. But with that in mind, I thought I would share some of my favorite names from movies past. Now, bear in mind, I could be mistaken and my interpretation of the purpose of the name could be terribly, terribly wrong (many people thing that Arthur Miller chose Loman for his Death of a Salesman character for low man, but he said it was a name he heard one time in an old film and he liked the sound of it). But at any rate, here I go.

 

Chinatown –

 

Noah Cross. One of my favorite names has always been Noah Cross, the name of the villain. There are a couple of puns and ironies here. First, he is named Noah and is trying to bring a monopoly on water to Los Angeles. Then there is “no cross”, suggestion a very un-Christian like person. Continue reading