POP ART: Episode 43, The Truman Show/Dark City


IS IT REAL OR IS IT MEMOREX-“Good morning, and in case I don’t see ya, good afternoon, good evening, and good night!”  Look to your right. What do you see? Are you sure? Look to your left? What do you see there? Look again. Are you sure? Are you really sure? Are you really, really, really sure? Sounds like it’s time for Episode 43 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time round, I am happy to welcome back a previous guest, writer, director, producer and actor Michelle Ehlen, who has chosen the Peter Weir directed, Jim Carrey vehicle The Truman Show and I have chosen the cult favorite, sci-fi noir Dark City. And in this episode we answer such questions as: How does Charlie Chaplin fit in? What are the similarities between the two films in plot? What are the similarities in philosophy? What is the Truman Show Delusion? Why are some parts of Dark City reminiscent of The Matrix? How does the Rocky Horror Show fit in? Why did Siskel and Ebert apologize to Jim Carrey? What is Thursdayism? Rockwell or Hopper? Sartre, Schmartre?

Meanwhile, check out Michelle’s IMDB page at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm1615954/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0

And her films on Amazon and other streaming platforms: https://www.amazon.com/s?k=michelle+ehlen&i=instant-video&crid=37LYCT29WI1S0&sprefix=michelle+ehlen%2Cinstant-video%2C209&ref=nb_sb_ss_c_3_14_ts-doa-p Continue reading

POP ART: Episode 42, L.A. Confidential/Double Indemnity


NEW EPISODE: FATALE ATTRACTION “Wrapped up in tissue paper with pink ribbons on it”. Valentine’s Day is here. What better way to celebrate the holiday that with films that explore everything that makes Valentine’s great…murder, greed, corruption, adultery, and, yes, most important of all, femme fatales. Sounds like it’s time for Episode 42 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For my listeners, please like, follow or comment. This time, I am happy to welcome two fellow podcasters, Richard and Amanda Kirkham, a father/daughter team, who have chosen the Curtis Hanson neo-noir about 1950s Los Angeles, LA Confidential and I have chosen the Billy Wilder/Raymond Chandler film noir classic about 1940s Los Angeles, Double Indemnity, films that tell us that, yes, Valentine’s Day can be the most fatale day of the year. And in this episode, we answer such questions as: What building code makes a scene in Double Indemnity unrealistic? How did James Elroy describe Curtis Hanson? Why did Stanwyk, Robinson and MacMurray not want to do Double Indemnity? What does Los Angeles Plays Itself have to say about these films? Where are the Spanish style homes located that are used in both films? Why is the character in Double Indemnity called Walter Neff instead of Walter Ness?

Check out Richard’s blog and podcast The Lamb at http://www.largeassmovieblogs.com/

And Amanda’s blog at https://hollywoodconsumer.wordpress.com/ Continue reading

POP ART: Episode 41, Tootsie/Some Like It Hot


GENDER BENDER. “Nobody’s perfect.” Are you sure that person sitting across from you is male? Are you sure the person sitting next to you is female? They say clothes make the man. But do they? Or do clothes make the woman? Well, whatever the answer is, it sounds like it’s time for Episode 41 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For my listeners, please like, follow or comment. Today, I am happy to welcome writer/producer/director/novelist #DwayneAlexanderSmith, who has chosen the gender bending farce and Dustin Hoffman vehicle, Tootsie, and I have chosen the Billy Wilder/IAL Diamond classic, Jack Lemon/Tony Curtis comedy, Some Like it Hot, both about men who disguise themselves as women and try to pass. And in this episode, we answer such questions as: What is a Tootsie shot? What is the greatest last line in movie history? What held up the release of Tootsie? What does Some Like it Hot mean? Is Tootsie mansplaining? What did Cary Grant think of Tony Curtis in Some Like it Hot? Why does Bill Murray not have a credit at the beginning of the movie? What is historically inaccurate about the costumes in Some Like it Hot?

Check out Dwayne’s IMDB credits and his films via https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0808051/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0

And his books at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=dwayne+alexander+smith&i=stripbooks&crid=2CXZXXA8I6TM4&sprefix=dwayne+alexan%2Caps%2C210&ref=nb_sb_ss_c_3_13_ts-doa-p especially Forty Acres about to be a major motion picture Continue reading

POP ART: Episode 40, Dead Calm/Knife in the Water


STRANGER DANGER. “I left the cucumbers behind” Our mothers always warned us. Always wear clean underwear. Always finish the food on your plate, there are children starving in other countries. Never pick up strangers. But do we listen to her? Of course, not. And because of that, we have to pay the penalty. Sounds like the perfect time for Episode 40 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For my listeners, please like, follow or comment. For this episode, I welcome writer/producer/director Robert Brody, who has chosen the Nicole Kidman, San Neill, Billy Zane three-handed thriller Dead Calm, and I have chosen Roman Polanski’s freshman feature, the Polish arthouse classic Knife in the Water, both about a couple who pick up a stranger and find themselves in sexual and physical conflict while on a boat at sea. And in this episode, we answer such questions as: Why do you never ask Billy Zane to go boating? Who dubbed the voice of the hitchhiker in Knife in the Water and why? What are the technical accuracies and inaccuracies of both movies? How and why did they change the ending to Dead Calm? What is significant about Knife in the Water and the Oscars? Why didn’t Polanski remake Knife in the Water in Hollywood?

And be sure and stay tuned to the end where Robert very generously gives me a wonderful recommendation for my coverage service. Thank you, Robert. Continue reading