POP ART: Episode 81, Contact/Another Earth


POP ART, WHERE WE FIND THE POP CULTURE IN ART AND THE ART IN POP CULTURE. SODE.

OTHERWORDLY: Join me and writer Caitlin Duffy (Reacher, untitled Arnold Schwarzenegger Netflix series) while we talk two films about contact with another world, Contact and Another Earth.

“Boy, this is really going to change the Miss Universe Contest”. Are we alone in the universe? And if not, what does that mean? And what would aliens be like? And what would they want? To destroy us? To bring peace? To gain knowledge?…Sounds like it’s time for Episode 81 of Pop Art, where we find the pop culture in art and the art in pop culture. It’s the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture, and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. This time I am happy to welcome as my guest, writer Caitlin Duffy, who has chosen as her film the hard sci-fi Jody Foster film Contact, while I have chosen soft sci-fi Brit Marling film Another Earth, both films about first contact with beings from another planet.

And in this episode, we answer such questions as: What is SETI? What is hard sci-fi as opposed to soft sci-fi? Who do they want to play the president in Contact? Who is the Saw Lady? Why did they use Bill Clinton? What is special about the opening shot in Contact? Cyanide pill or no cyanide pill? Who is Steven Ford’s father? How does Gianni Versace fit in?

Check out Caitlin’s IMDB page at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm3044034/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 and be sure to check out Reacher on Amazon.

Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/

My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss

Meanwhile, like, follow or comment on my podcast. I’d love to know what you think. And check out the other episodes. On ITUNES https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/pop-art/id1511098925, Anchor: https://anchor.fm/howard-casner, and Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/5jX4noVGArDJdmcFtmrQcG , Sticher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/pop-art, Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/…, Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/pop-art, Pocketcasts: https://pca.st/vfjqj6j6, Radiopublic: https://radiopublic.com/pop-art-GExxNb and other streaming sites

Check out my Script Consultation Services at http://ow.ly/HPxKE. I offer several types of service. Testimonials can be found at the blog entry.

Finally, I have published a collection of three of my plays, 3 Plays, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08478DBXF as well as two collections of short stories, The Starving Artists and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FS91CKJ and The Five Corporations and the One True Church and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07KY5Z3CF.

Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay?  Check out the second edition of my screenwriting book, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader published on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GD1XP9Y

HAPPY PRIDE MONTH: MY FAVORITE GAY FILMS, PART DEUX


In a follow up to my previous post of my top 30 gay films, I realized there were a lot more I wanted to share. Some of these should have appeared on the first list. Others are more obscure films. So here re 25 more. Have fun.

1977 – The Consequence. This 1977 West German film directed by Wolfgang (Das Boot) Petersen is about the son of a prison warden who falls in love with a prisoner. They begin a life together when the prisoner is released, but no one will just let them lead their lives. This was a time when gay films were almost required to have an unhappy ending.

1978 – In a Year with 13 Moons. More Fassbender. Erwin transitions to Elvira, but finds nothing but alienation from family and friends. She struggles to find meaning and purpose while visiting her past.

1980 – Taxi zum Klo. Directed, written and starring Frank Ripploh, this film was groundbreaking at the time in its sexual frankness and honesty about a teacher’s life in Berlin, caught between wanting no romantic restrictions and a lover who wants a monogamous relationship.

1983 – The Fourth Man. An early psychological thriller directed by Paul Verhoeven, it follows a bisexual writer who has sex with a woman, then falls for and seduces another of her lovers, only to find out she’s a witch.

1983 – Lianna. In this early film written and directed by John Sayles, a married woman realizes that she is attracted to women and has an affair with a college professor.

1992 – Swoon. Director Tom Kalin’s dramatization of the crimes of Leopold and Loeb, focusing more on their sexual relationship.

1992 – The Living End. Writer/director Gregg Araki’s early entry in the new queer cinema follows a gay hustler and a movie critic, both HIV+, who meet and fall in love. In what is called a gay Thelma and Louise, one kills a homophobic police officer and the two go on the run.

1993 – Farewell My Concubine. Directed by Kaige Chen, two boys meet in 1924 at a Peking opera school. They friendship lasts their whole lives informed by their country’s turbulent history, one in unrequited love with the other.

1996 – Killer Condom. Written and directed by Martin Walz, from a comic book by Ralf Konig, this German film that takes place in New York, revolves around a condom with teeth that goes around murdering people in a hotel called Quicky. It’s up to a gay police detective who is, shall we say, well blessed, to find the murderous rubber.

1997 – Steam: The Turkish Bath. A man inherits a Turkish bath from his aunt and restores it, leading to his realization that he likes men. Directed by Ferzan Ozpetek.

1997 – The Hanging Garden. Writer/director Thom Fitzgerald’s feature debut is a British/Canadian film about a morbidly obese gay young man who is caught about to have sex with another man. Ostracized by his parents, he considers hanging himself, but leaves home to return ten years later for his sister’s wedding, having lost all his weight and at peace with being gay.

1999 – All About My Mother. Pedro Almodóvar wrote and directed this Spanish film about a mother who, after her teenage son is killed in a traffic accident, tries to find his father who has transitioned into a woman. ‘

2000 – Confusion of Genders. From France and Ilan Duran Cohen comes this story of a bisexual attorney who is sleeping with his boss, his client, his client’s girlfriend and a young man who ends up living with him.

1999 – Aimee & Jaguar. In German director Max Faberbock’s historical drama, it’s 1943 Berlin and a Nazi officer’s wife has an affair with a Jewish woman.

2005 – C.R.A.Z.Y. In French Canada, the youngest brother of a conservative and homophobic Catholic family tries to come to terms with being gay.

2006 – Dark Blue Almost Black. Daniel Sanchez Arevalo’s feature follows two best friends. One whose infertile brother asks him to impregnate his girlfriend since he is in prison. The other who spies on a gay masseuse and discovers he knows one of the clients, leading him to find out something about himself.

2006 – The Bubble. Eytan Fox’s Israeli drama updates the Romeo and Juliet story to modern day Tel Aviv as an Israeli and Palestinian fall in love.

2008 – Antarctica. Another film from Israel. Written and directed by Yair Hochner, a gay man turning thirty drifts from one sexual encounter to another until he finally finds someone who can melt his heart.

2012 – Out in the Dark. Michael Mayer directed this thriller about an Israel lawyer and a Palestinian who fall in love. But their relationship gets complicated when the secret police want to use the Palestinian to help capture those working against the government.

2013 – Stranger by the Lake. In this Alain Guiraudie film, a young man spends his days at a gay cruising spot at a lake. He is attracted to one of the regulars. He sees the man kill someone, but still begins a sexual relationship with him.

2017 – A Fantastic Woman. Winner of the Best International Feature at the Oscars, this Sebastian Lelio drama focuses on a transgendered woman who has to come to terms with the death of her older boyfriend, while confronting his family.

2017 – The Cakemaker. Ofir Raul Grazier wrote and directed this drama about a pastry chef living in Germany who starts an affair with a man visiting from Israel. When the man dies, the chef goes to Jerusalem and takes a job at the widow’s café without telling her who he is.

2017 – Thelma. Directed by Joachim Trier. Thelma comes from a very conservative religious family. When she goes to college, a fellow female student falls in love with her. But Thelma’s denial of her true feelings causes her to subconsciously release her telekinetic power resulting in tragedy.

2021 – Flee. This feature was nominated for Best International Feature, Best Documentary, and Best Animated Feature and under the direction of Jonas Poher Rasmussen tells the story of a young gay man and his family trying to flee to safety after the Soviet Union withdraws from Afghanistan.

2021 – Benedetta. Paul Verhoeven’s over the top, campy treatment of a young 17th century girl who has visions. This leads her to joining a convent and rising to the top while having an affair with a fellow nun.

Happy Holidays.

Meanwhile, listen, like, follow or comment on my podcast, POP ART, the podcast where we find the pop culture in art and the art in pop culture. Every episode, my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll choose a film from the more art/indie/foreign/classic side of cinema that has a connection to it.

On ITUNES https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/pop-art/id1511098925, Anchor: https://anchor.fm/howard-casner, and Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/5jX4noVGArDJdmcFtmrQcG , Sticher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/pop-art, Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/…, Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/pop-art, Pocketcasts: https://pca.st/vfjqj6j6, Radiopublic: https://radiopublic.com/pop-art-GExxNb and other streaming sites

HAPPY PRIDE: MY TOP 30 GAY FILMS


It’s June, which means it is Pride month. So here is my pick of the top 30 gay films.

1931 – Mädchen in Uniform – The controversial and often censored German film directed by Leontine Sagan from the play by Christa Winsloe. A young girl is sent to a private boarding school and falls in love with one of her teachers.

1941 – The Maltese Falcon – This third, and best, version of the classic Dashiell Hammett story, written and directed by John Huston, involves private detective Sam Spade, played by Humphrey Bogart, becoming involved in a search for a priceless treasure, with three of the four bad guys being queer as a three dollar bill.

1961 – Victim – The first English-language film to use the word homosexuality. This British film directed by Basil Dearden follows a barrister played by Dirk Bogarde as he is being blackmailed for being gay.

1971 – Sunday Bloody Sunday – Director John Schlesinger and writer Penelope Gilliatt give us this swinging London look at a triangle consisting of a female office worker, a male doctor, and the male artist who drifts between the two of them.

1972 – Cabaret – One of the greatest musicals of all time. Directed by Bob Fosse and adapted from the stage by Jay Presson Allen, a gay man goes to Berlin in the 1930s and finds himself caught up with a cabaret singer and the rise of Nazism.

1972 – The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant – The story is driven by the sexual conflicts between a fashion designer, her female assistant, and the young woman the designer leaves her assistant for. One of Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s films that put him on the map. With Hannah Schygulla.

1975 – Fox and his Friends – Fassbinder again. He plays the central role, a plain, working-class gay man who wins the lottery. And then is quickly taken advantage of by his friends and lovers.

1975 – Dog Day Afternoon – Al Pacino plays a bank robber trying to raise money to help his boyfriend get a sex change operation. Directed by Sidney Lumet. With John Cazale.

1982 – Personal Best – In this film written and directed by Robert Towne (Forget it, Jake. It’s Chinatown), a female track and field athlete is caught between two romantic interests; her male coach and her main female rival.

1985 – My Beautiful Laundrette – In a metaphor about an England on the verge of cultural change, a young Pakistani man joins forces with his white boyfriend to make their fortune by opening a laundromat. This is an early film that got Daniel Day-Lewis really noticed. Directed by Stephen Frears.

1987 – Law of Desire – Pedro Almodóvar’s tragicomedy about a gay film maker who becomes involved with an obsessive fan while still longing after his straight ex-boyfriend. With Antonio Banderas and Almodóvar muse Carmen Maura.

1991 – Edward II – Derek Jarmen’s transgressive adaptation of Christopher Marlowe’s play of the same name about a king who sacrifices it all for the man he loves. With Tilda Swinton.

1994 – The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert – Two drag performers and a transgender woman take their cabaret act across the lengths of Australia. With Hugo Weaving, Guy Pearce, and Terence Stamp. Written and directed by Stephen Elliott.

1996 – Bound – Jennifer Tilly and Gina Gershon, one a mobster’s girlfriend, the other an ex-con plumber, join forces and become lovers in order to cheat the mob of a suitcase of money. Written and directed by Lily and Lana Wachowski.

1998 – High Art – Written and directed by Lisa Cholodenko, the movie dramatizes an up and coming magazine writer who has an affair with her new subject, a drug addicted photographer. With Ally Sheedy as the photographer.

2000 – Before Night Falls – Javier Bardem received his first Oscar nomination for this biographical film about the Cuban writer Reinaldo Arenas, who managed to escape to the US. Directed by Julian Schnabel, with Johnny Depp in a dual roll as a prisoner who dresses in drag and a Lieutenant at the prison.

2004 – Mysterious Skin – Two boys are molested by a pedophile. One grows up to be a hustler, the other grows up believing he was abducted by aliens in this powerful drama written and directed by Greg Araki. With Joseph Gordon-Levitt.

2004 – Bad Education – Another Almodóvar entry. Two friends who meet while attending a Catholic school under the repressive regime of Franco reunite later when one is an actor and one is a film director. Or is something else going on? With Gael Garcia Bernal.

2005 – Time to Leave – Francois Ozon’s drama about a gay fashion designer who is diagnosed with a brain tumor and decides to forgo medical help and die on this own terms.

2005 – Brokeback Mountain – Director Ang Lee and writers Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana broke new ground, at least from a Hollywood point of view, in this story of two modern day cowboys who fall in love. With Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal.

2009 – I Killed My Mother – Québécois Xavier Dolan’s first, and still probably best, film is a semi-autobiographical story of a young gay man’s conflicts with his mother.

2009 – A Single Man – Colin Firth stars as a professor whose is having trouble coping with the death of his lover who he met just as World War II ended. Directed by Tom Ford and co-starring Julianne Moore.

2013 – Blue is the Warmest Colour – In this Cannes award winner, a high school student from a working-class background meets and falls in love with a collegiate who travels in more intellectual circles; will their relationship be able to survive their class differences? Directed by Abdellatif Kechiche.

2015 – Tangerine – A trendsetting movie filmed entirely on a phone.  Aided by her best friend, a transsexual hooker goes up and down Sunset Boulevard trying to find her pimp who cheated on her while she was in prison, having taken the fall for something the pimp did.

2015 – Carol – From the short story, The Price of Salt by Patricia Highsmith, one of the few gay stories to have a happy ending at the time it was written. An up-and-coming photographer falls in love with an older woman leading to complications in both of their lives. With Oscar nominees Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara. Directed by Todd Haynes.

2016 – Moonlight – Writer/director Barry Jenkins Oscar winning film (remember that ceremony) about three stages in a young man’s life as he struggles with his sexual identity and life on the hard streets of Miami. With Oscar winner Mahershala Ali.

2016 – The Handmaiden – From the director of Old Boy and Thirst comes another South Korean masterpiece in which a handmaiden helps and falls in love with a Japanese heiress who is being defrauded by her guardian.

2017 – God’s Own Country – Francis Lee’s debut feature dramatizes the growing love between an unhappy farmer and a Romanian immigrant hired for lambing season.

2017 – BPM (Beats Per Minute) – This French masterpiece focuses on a love affair between HIV+ and HIV- activists in the early days of AIDS activism in France. Directed by Robin Campillo.

Happy Pride month.

Meanwhile, listen, like, follow or comment on my podcast, POP ART, the podcast where we find the pop culture in art and the art in pop culture. Every episode, my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll choose a film from the more art/indie/foreign/classic side of cinema that has a connection to it.

On ITUNES https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/pop-art/id1511098925, Anchor: https://anchor.fm/howard-casner, and Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/5jX4noVGArDJdmcFtmrQcG , Sticher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/pop-art, Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/…, Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/pop-art, Pocketcasts: https://pca.st/vfjqj6j6, Radiopublic: https://radiopublic.com/pop-art-GExxNb and other streaming sites

POP ART: Episode 77, 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY/SOLARIS


SPACED: I know what you are going to say. Episode 77, shouldn’t this be episode 81? Good eye. Benish and I tried to record this episode twice and Skype let us down. But three’s the charm and Skype came through, but I decided to keep the original episode number because…let’s just say HAL made me do it.

Also, we have already covered a Tarkovsky film and a Kubrick film. So while waiting for this one, use the time to listen to Episode 76, The Shining/The Innkeepers with podcaster and film enthusiast Nicholas Rehak, as well as Episode 37, Annihilation/Stalker with filmmaker Gustavo A. Garzon.

“Open the pod bay doors, Hal” What is space? The final frontier? A place where no one can hear you scream?  Or, as the introduction to one guide to the galaxy says, it’s big, really big. You just won’t believe how vastly, hugely, mind bogglingly big it is…Sounds like it’s time for Episode 77 of Pop Art, where we find the art in pop culture and the pop culture in art. For Pop Art, my guest chooses a movie from popular culture, and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. For this episode, I am happy to welcome as my guest, Hollywood hyphenate, producer, director, actor, writer Adam Benish, who has chosen as his film Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece, 2001: A Space Odyssey, while I have chosen as my film Andrei Tarkovsky’s masterpiece, Solaris, both films about odd occurrences in outer space.

And in this episode we answer such questions as: Why did they change the tagline on the 2001 poster to “The Ultimate Trip”? What did Tarkovsky and Kubrick think of each other’s films? What does HAL stand for? The jump cut at the end of the Dawn of Man sequence goes from a bone to a what? Was Tarkovsky murdered? What are tokusatsu films? What did Rock Hudson think of 2001? In Solaris, where was the long drive filmed and why was it not cut from the movie? What is the theory of punctuated equilibrium? How did Kubrick end up getting all the credit for the special effects? What was the chief irony in the making of both films when it comes the country the directors came from? What did the Vatican think of 2001? What was the title of Mad Magazine’s parody of 2001?

And check out Adam Benish’s IMD page at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm2354563/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0

You can find more information about his films on social media on YouTube, twitter and Instagram at Benish Films and @BenishFilms

His film Generations Under Sail is now making the film festival circuit.

Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/

My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss

Meanwhile, like, follow or comment on my podcast. I’d love to know what you think. And check out the other episodes. On ITUNES https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/pop-art/id1511098925, Anchor: https://anchor.fm/howard-casner, and Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/5jX4noVGArDJdmcFtmrQcG , Sticher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/pop-art, Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/…, Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/pop-art, Pocketcasts: https://pca.st/vfjqj6j6, Radiopublic: https://radiopublic.com/pop-art-GExxNb and other streaming sites

Check out my Script Consultation Services at http://ow.ly/HPxKE. I offer several types of service. Testimonials can be found at the blog entry.

Finally, I have published a collection of three of my plays, 3 Plays, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08478DBXF as well as two collections of short stories, The Starving Artists and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FS91CKJ and The Five Corporations and the One True Church and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07KY5Z3CF.

Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay?  Check out the second edition of my screenwriting book, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader published on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GD1XP9Y

THE TOP TEN POP ART EPISODES–WHICH ONES HAVE YOU LISTENED TO


Pop Art, where we find the pop culture in art and the art in pop culture, lists its top ten most popular episodes. How many have you seen?

Episode 38, Go/71 Fragments of a Chronicle of Chance with film enthusiast and podcaster of Cinemarecall, The Vern

Episode 18, The Karate Kid/Let the Right One In, with film enthusiast and podcaster of the Forgotten Film Podcast, Todd Liebenow

Episode 1, Raiders of the Lost Arc/The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, with filmmaker and podcaster of  the Blue Beetle and The Real Short Box, Donald McKinney, III

Episode 25, The Running Man/The Most Dangerous Game, with writer and film critic, influencer and book reviewer, Hermione Flavia

Episode 8, Star Wars/The Hidden Fortress, with screenwriter, script consultant, blogger and podcaster, Paul Zeidman

Episode 19, Finding Nemo/The Searchers, with blogger and film reviewer Drew of Drew’s Movie Reviews

Episode 74, Warm Bodies/I Walked With a Zombie, with film enthusiast and movie blogger Rishabh Vashishtha

Episode 16, Galaxy Quest/The Seven Samurai, with filmmaker Anna Remus

Episode 76, The Shining/The Innkeepers, with podcaster and film enthusiast, Nick Rehak of French Toast Sunday

Episode 25, Hell or High Water/Bonnie and Clyde, with film enthusiast, writer and blogger Kira Comerford

And after listening to them, check out the other episodes and help them move up the list.

 On ITUNES https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/pop-art/id1511098925, Anchor: https://anchor.fm/howard-casner, and Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/5jX4noVGArDJdmcFtmrQcG , Sticher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/pop-art, Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/…, Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/pop-art, Pocketcasts: https://pca.st/vfjqj6j6, Radiopublic: https://radiopublic.com/pop-art-GExxNb and other streaming sites

POP ART: Episode 80, THE JERK/O LUCKY MAN!


PRETTY AS A PICARESQUE: New Pop Art episode. Join me and filmmaker Steve Herold (Death of an Umbrella Salesman, Walmea) while we talk two films inspired by Voltaire’s Candide, The Jerk and O Lucky Man!

“I was born a poor black child”: It’s a tale as old as the Spanish Golden Age and made perhaps most famous in the west by Voltaire’s Candide. Take a somewhat naïve innocent, usually of lower social class, thrust him out in the world, and have him navigate the slings and arrows he encounters, trying to survive in an essentially corrupt society. Or as I call it, Episode 80 of Pop Art, where I and my guest find the pop culture in art and the art in pop culture. It’s the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture, and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. For this episode, I am happy to welcome as my guest, filmmaker Steve Herold, who has chosen as his film the Steve Martin vehicle, Carl Reiner’s The Jerk, while I have chosen Lindsay Anderson’s cult favorite, O Lucky Man!, both picaresque films with a naïve innocent having to go out on his own to discover the world.

And in this episode we answer such questions as: Quentin Tarantino’s The Jerk? Reactive, active or passive? What is white male protestant comedy? What are the problematic aspects of both films? How does Stanley Kubrick fit in? How many slaps did McDowell endure in the final scene? What is Steve Martin’s favorite line? What is the French title of O Lucky Man!? Where was Hartounian’s gas station located? How does Star Wars fit in and what does it have to do with Pig Man? Where does Rob Reiner appear in the film?

And don’t forget to check out Steve Herold and his films. His IMDB page is at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0003750/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0#director

Hs film Death of an Umbrella Salesman can be found on Amazon Prime and his newest film Walmea is making the festival rounds.

Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/

My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss

Meanwhile, like, follow or comment on my podcast. I’d love to know what you think. And check out the other episodes. On ITUNES https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/pop-art/id1511098925, Anchor: https://anchor.fm/howard-casner, and Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/5jX4noVGArDJdmcFtmrQcG , Sticher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/pop-art, Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/…, Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/pop-art, Pocketcasts: https://pca.st/vfjqj6j6, Radiopublic: https://radiopublic.com/pop-art-GExxNb and other streaming sites

Check out my Script Consultation Services at http://ow.ly/HPxKE. I offer several types of service. Testimonials can be found at the blog entry.

Finally, I have published a collection of three of my plays, 3 Plays, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08478DBXF as well as two collections of short stories, The Starving Artists and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FS91CKJ and The Five Corporations and the One True Church and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07KY5Z3CF.

Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay?  Check out the second edition of my screenwriting book, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader published on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GD1XP9Y

TOP 20 SCI-FI FILMS SINCE 2000


I thought I might have some fun and start making a few lists about various movie topics. So here are my top 20 sci-fi movies since 2000. They are in alphabetical order rather than preference. What are yours?

I have covered a number of these films on my podcast Pop Art and have listed the episode numbers by the titles. The podcast can be found at: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/pop-art/id1511098925, https://anchor.fm/howard-casner, https://open.spotify.com/show/5jX4noVGArDJdmcFtmrQcG and other streaming platforms.

The American Astronaut

Another Earth

Attack the Block – Episode 10

Blindness

Coherence – Episode 47

Donnie Darko – Episode 60

Extraterrestrial

The Last Days

The Lobster

Logan

Monsters

Never Let Me Go

Predestination

Primer

Sleep Dealer

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-verse – Episode 47

Time of the Wolf

Upstream Color – Episode 15

POP ART: Episode 79, Jacob’s Ladder, A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH


WANTED DEAD OR ALIVE:  Join filmmaker Nicole Jones-Dion, one of the winners of the Fox Writers Incubator Program, as we discuss two films about people caught between life and death-the horror/thriller Jacob’s Ladder and the romantic fantasy A Matter of Life and Death, aka Stairway to Heaven.

“Jake. New York is filled with creatures”. Don’t you hate when this happens? You’re dead. No, you’re still alive. No, you’re dead. No, you’re alive. No, you’re…Sounds like it’s time for Episode 79 of Pop Art, where we find the pop culture in art and the art in pop culture. It’s the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture, and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. Today, I am happy to welcome as my guest, filmmaker Nicole Jones-Dion, who has selected, as her choice, the Adrian Lyne/Bruce Joel Rubin expressionistic thriller Jacob’s Ladder, while I have chosen Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s epic fantasy A Matter of Life and Death, aka Stairway to Heaven, both films about characters caught between life and death.  

And in this episode we answer such questions as: Why do these sorts of films fascinate people? Why did Lyne change the location of the courtroom scene between Tim Robbins and Jason Alexander from a hallway to a stairwell? What was the original purpose in making A Matter of Life and Death? What is the major difference between Lyne’s vision and Rubin’s vision of Jacob’s Ladder? Why was the title A Matter of Life and Death changed to Stairway to Heaven in the US? Why did Rubin do that sent him on a spiritual quest and led him to write about these themes of life and death? How does WWII and Viet Nan play into the two films? How does Planet of the Apes fit in? The Tibetan Book of the Dead? On what day did they begin filming A Matter of Life and Death and what is its significance? Who is Tom Rolf and why is he the unsung hero of Jacob’s Ladder? How do the James Bond films fit in? What does the title Jacob’s Ladder refer to? Who is Jezebel?

Check out Nicole’s IMDB page at https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5702566/?ref_=nm_flmg_wr_4

And her film Stasis on IMDB TV and Amazon

Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/

My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss

Meanwhile, like, follow or comment on my podcast. I’d love to know what you think. And check out the other episodes. On ITUNES https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/pop-art/id1511098925, Anchor: https://anchor.fm/howard-casner, and Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/5jX4noVGArDJdmcFtmrQcG , Sticher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/pop-art, Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/…, Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/pop-art, Pocketcasts: https://pca.st/vfjqj6j6, Radiopublic: https://radiopublic.com/pop-art-GExxNb and other streaming sites

Check out my Script Consultation Services at http://ow.ly/HPxKE. I offer several types of service. Testimonials can be found at the blog entry.

Finally, I have published a collection of three of my plays, 3 Plays, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08478DBXF as well as two collections of short stories, The Starving Artists and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FS91CKJ and The Five Corporations and the One True Church and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07KY5Z3CF.

Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay?  Check out the second edition of my screenwriting book, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader published on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GD1XP9Y

POP ART: Episode 78, Bull Durham/This Sporting Life–It Takes Balls


 POP ART, WHERE I FIND THE POP CULTURE IN ART AND THE ART IN POP CULTURE. Join me and podcaster, blogger and film enthusiast Richard Kirkham as we discuss Bull Durham and This Sporting Life, two films about athletes in existential crises.

I know what you’re thinking. What happened to Episode 77. Well, we recorded that episode on 2001 and Solaris twice, but Skype failed to download it. But everything seems fine now and we should be doing that episode in the near future. For some illogical reason, I decided to keep it Episode 77. Don’t ask me.  

IT TAKES A LOT OF BALLS: I believe in the Church of Baseball. It’s spring when a young man’s fancy turns to thoughts of…sports; or sport for our English listeners. Yes, sounds like it’s time for Episode 78 of Pop Art, where we find the pop culture in art and the art in pop culture. It’s the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture, and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. This time round, I am happy to welcome back, for the fourth time, Richard Kirkham, who has chosen as his film the Ron Shelton low key classic Bull Durham, while I have chosen the Lindsay Anderson’s angry young man, kitchen sink drama This Sporting Life, both films about athletes going through an existential crisis.

And in this episode we answer such questions as: What is it about sports films? What does it mean to win by losing? What do the writers of both films have in common? What happened during the Broadway production of David Storey’s The Changing Room that didn’t shock little old ladies? Where did the names come from? If a baseball player hits the bull do they really get a free steak dinner? How does Ron Shelton resemble his Bull Durham hero? How does Lawrence Olivier fit in? Who did the producers of Bull Durham want for Tim Robbin’s role first and how did Ron Shelton react? Why were young men angry in Britain?

Check out the LAMBcast at http://www.largeassmovieblogs.com/

Check out Richard’s blog at https://kirkhamclass.blogspot.com/?fbclid=IwAR3YYgDVY-42zT8hsDDo5ECSNe1xyPP9x2bvUAmm_XsVDDjtUjp3Aj8smCQ

Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/

My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss

Meanwhile, like, follow or comment on my podcast. I’d love to know what you think. And check out the other episodes. On ITUNES https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/pop-art/id1511098925, Anchor: https://anchor.fm/howard-casner, and Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/5jX4noVGArDJdmcFtmrQcG , Sticher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/pop-art, Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/…, Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/pop-art, Pocketcasts: https://pca.st/vfjqj6j6, Radiopublic: https://radiopublic.com/pop-art-GExxNb and other streaming sites

Check out my Script Consultation Services at http://ow.ly/HPxKE. I offer several types of service. Testimonials can be found at the blog entry.

Finally, I have published a collection of three of my plays, 3 Plays, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08478DBXF as well as two collections of short stories, The Starving Artists and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FS91CKJ and The Five Corporations and the One True Church and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07KY5Z3CF.

Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay?  Check out the second edition of my screenwriting book, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader published on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GD1XP9Y

POP ART: Episode 76, The Shining, The Innkeepers, They check in, but do they check out


POP ART, WHERE I FIND THE POP CULTURE IN ART AND THE ART IN POP CULTURE. Join me and podcaster and film enthusiast Nick Rehak as we discuss two films about haunted hotels, The Shining and The Innkeepers.

THEY CHECK IN, BUT DO THEY CHECK OUT: All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy. It’s vacation time. You make your reservations. You find what you think is the perfect get away. You register. And then…well, I can’t say because it’s just that gruesome…Sounds like it’s time for Episode 76 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture, and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. This time round, I am happy to welcome as my guest, podcaster and film enthusiast, Nick Rehak, who has chosen as his film the Stanley Kubrick horror classic The Shining, while I have chosen new filmmaker Ti West’s small indie The Innkeepers, both films about haunted hotels.

And in this episode we ask such questions as: Does Kubrick believe in ghosts? What are the two kinds of haunted house/buildings movies? Who said: God is a big, black slab from outer space and the devil is a bartender named Lloyd? What did Ti West have to say about The Shining? Why did Kubrick make The Shining? What did co-writer Diane Johnson think of Stephen King? Why do horror movies focus so much on female characters? How long did it take to shoot The Innkeepers? What Razzie Awards did The Shining get nominated for? Why is it wrong to call the two girls in The Shining twins? Who dubbed Jack Nicholson in Italy?

Be sure to look up Nick Rehak at Rehak Radio https://www.mixcloud.com/TheRehak/rehak-radio-the-first-episode-51121/

His podcast at French Toast Sunday https://frenchtoastsunday.com/podcasts

Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/

My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss

Meanwhile, like, follow or comment on my podcast. I’d love to know what you think. And check out the other episodes. On ITUNES https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/pop-art/id1511098925, Anchor: https://anchor.fm/howard-casner, and Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/5jX4noVGArDJdmcFtmrQcG , Sticher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/pop-art, Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/…, Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/pop-art, Pocketcasts: https://pca.st/vfjqj6j6, Radiopublic: https://radiopublic.com/pop-art-GExxNb and other streaming sites

Check out my Script Consultation Services at http://ow.ly/HPxKE. I offer several types of service. Testimonials can be found at the blog entry.

Finally, I have published a collection of three of my plays, 3 Plays, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08478DBXF as well as two collections of short stories, The Starving Artists and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FS91CKJ and The Five Corporations and the One True Church and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07KY5Z3CF.

Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay?  Check out the second edition of my screenwriting book, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader published on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GD1XP9Y