POP ART: Episode 47, Spider-Man: Into the Spiderverse/Coherence


PARALLEL PARKING: “With great ability comes great accountability”. Are we alone in the universe? Perhaps, more importantly, is our universe alone in the universe?  Sounds like it’s time for Episode 47 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, I am happy to welcome as my guest, Hollywood hyphenate, writer/director/producer Keith Hartman who has chosen the exciting and innovative animated film Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse and I have chosen the low budget, indie film and first feature from James Ward Byrkit, Coherence. Both movies with plots containing parallel universes.

And in this episode, we ask such questions as: Who steals a bagel? What happened on the final night of shooting in Coherence? What is PDNY? What scene in Rick and Morty resembles a scene in Coherence? What happens whenever you hit pause when a train goes by in Spider-Man? How much did it cost to make Coherence? Where does “leap of faith” come from and how does existentialism, post modernism and gender meets diversity fit in?

Check out Keith’s IMDB page at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm1402329/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_1

Check out his films on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/s?k=keith+hartman&i=instant-video&ref=nb_sb_noss

And his books at: https://www.amazon.com/s?k=keith+hartman&i=digital-text&ref=nb_sb_noss Continue reading

POP ART: Episode 46, Do the Right Thing/Les Miserables


 THE RACE IS ON: “Wake up, Wake up, Wake up.” Black Lives Matter. Antifa. Breonna Taylor. George Floyd. January 6th. Sounds like it’s time for Episode 46 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, I am happy to welcome producer/director Martina Silcock who has chosen the controversial and game changing Spike Lee joint Do The Right Thing, and I have chosen the astounding first feature by French filmmaker Ladj Ly, Les Miserables, both about racial tensions that explode in a single neighborhood leading to acts of violence and a riot.

And in this episode, we answer such questions as: What are the source materials for each film? Who did Spike Lee want for Sal first? What happened at Cannes and the Oscars? How does Parasite fit in? How does the Twilight Zone fit in? Are the endings satisfactory? What movie did Michelle and Barak Obama see on their first date?

Check out Martina’s IDMB page at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm3697341/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0

Check out her films at:

Lines in the Sand: https://www.amazon.com/Lines-Richardson-Michael-Gilroy-Kerensa/dp/B01N14BWH5/

The Nest Egg: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QIWcjZE-vSM&t=360s

Mogul Mowgli: https://www.mogulmowgli.co.uk/

Her site: http://www.notthetennisplayer.com/

A site for underrepresented groups: https://www.lookbeyondthelist.com/

And keep a look out for Pig, starring Nicholas Cage Continue reading

POP ART: Episode 45, True Romance/Pierrot le Fou


THE COURSE OF TRUE LOVE NEVER DID RUN SMOOTH: “Okie, dokey, doggie daddy.” We’ve all been there, done that. We meet someone. Fall in love. Pledge our lives to each other. Then, as so often happens, we kill someone or rob someone of drugs or money and have to go on the run. Who hasn’t found themselves in that situation? Sounds like it’s time for Episode 45 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, I am happy to welcome fellow podcaster Jarrett Galante, aka Clark F. Gable, who has chosen the Tony Scott/Quentin Tarantino neo-noir, True Romance, and I have chosen the quite different Jean Luc Godard French film classic, Pierrot le Fou, both about lovers on the run.

And in this episode, we answer such questions as: What did Tarantino do to raise money to make Reservoir Dogs and how does Elvis fit in? Are Tarantino and Godard post-modern or post-post-modern? How does the movie Pineapple Express fit in? Who is Sam Fuller and would you want to be one? Where did the Sicilian story come from in True Romance? Where does Godard stand in the pantheon of directors? Where does Tarantino? What are the differences between the original screenplay and the final one in True Romance and what did Tarantino think about it? Where did the True Romance theme come from?

Meanwhile check out Jarrett’s podcast The REAL Short Box at https://www.facebook.com/therealshortbox/

And Jarrett’s IDMB profile at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm1445425/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Continue reading

POP ART: Episode 44, Fast Times at Ridgemont Hight/The Last Picture Show


SCHOOL DAZED: “Aloha, Mr. Hand.” It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. No, actually, it was just the worst of times. The most nightmarish and traumatic years of our lives. A quagmire of debilitating despair sucking the life and soul out of us all. Or as it is more commonly called, high school. Sounds like it’s time for Episode 44 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, I am happy to welcome back previous guests, fellow podcasters Anna Keiser and Derek Dehanke, who have chosen the Amy Heckerling/Cameron Crowe 1980s classic Fast Times at Ridgemont High and I have chosen the Peter Bogdanovich/Larry McMurty 1970s classic The Last Picture Show, both about teens navigating the difficult years of high school.

And in this episode, we answer such questions as: Who was originally asked to play Mr. Hand in Fast Times at Ridgemont High? What happened to Peter Bogdanovich’s career? What did Roger Ebert say about both films? Who was originally offered the Ben Johnson role in The Last Picture Show? What book did the person that was the basis for Mark “Rat” Ratner in Fast Times… write and what is his relation to pizza? Why is The Last Picture Show in b&w? What is Phil Spectre’s relation to Fast Times…? What two scenes did Fast Time… have to choose between to avoid an X rating?

Check out Anna and Derek’s podcast, ‘80s Movie Montage, at https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/80s-movie-montage/id1498851364 and other streaming platforms.

Keep a look out for Anna’s short film She Had It Coming, now showing at film festivals.

Continue reading

POP ART: Episode 43, The Truman Show/Dark City


IS IT REAL OR IS IT MEMOREX-“Good morning, and in case I don’t see ya, good afternoon, good evening, and good night!”  Look to your right. What do you see? Are you sure? Look to your left? What do you see there? Look again. Are you sure? Are you really sure? Are you really, really, really sure? Sounds like it’s time for Episode 43 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time round, I am happy to welcome back a previous guest, writer, director, producer and actor Michelle Ehlen, who has chosen the Peter Weir directed, Jim Carrey vehicle The Truman Show and I have chosen the cult favorite, sci-fi noir Dark City. And in this episode we answer such questions as: How does Charlie Chaplin fit in? What are the similarities between the two films in plot? What are the similarities in philosophy? What is the Truman Show Delusion? Why are some parts of Dark City reminiscent of The Matrix? How does the Rocky Horror Show fit in? Why did Siskel and Ebert apologize to Jim Carrey? What is Thursdayism? Rockwell or Hopper? Sartre, Schmartre?

Meanwhile, check out Michelle’s IMDB page at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm1615954/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0

And her films on Amazon and other streaming platforms: https://www.amazon.com/s?k=michelle+ehlen&i=instant-video&crid=37LYCT29WI1S0&sprefix=michelle+ehlen%2Cinstant-video%2C209&ref=nb_sb_ss_c_3_14_ts-doa-p Continue reading

POP ART: Episode 42, L.A. Confidential/Double Indemnity


NEW EPISODE: FATALE ATTRACTION “Wrapped up in tissue paper with pink ribbons on it”. Valentine’s Day is here. What better way to celebrate the holiday that with films that explore everything that makes Valentine’s great…murder, greed, corruption, adultery, and, yes, most important of all, femme fatales. Sounds like it’s time for Episode 42 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For my listeners, please like, follow or comment. This time, I am happy to welcome two fellow podcasters, Richard and Amanda Kirkham, a father/daughter team, who have chosen the Curtis Hanson neo-noir about 1950s Los Angeles, LA Confidential and I have chosen the Billy Wilder/Raymond Chandler film noir classic about 1940s Los Angeles, Double Indemnity, films that tell us that, yes, Valentine’s Day can be the most fatale day of the year. And in this episode, we answer such questions as: What building code makes a scene in Double Indemnity unrealistic? How did James Elroy describe Curtis Hanson? Why did Stanwyk, Robinson and MacMurray not want to do Double Indemnity? What does Los Angeles Plays Itself have to say about these films? Where are the Spanish style homes located that are used in both films? Why is the character in Double Indemnity called Walter Neff instead of Walter Ness?

Check out Richard’s blog and podcast The Lamb at http://www.largeassmovieblogs.com/

And Amanda’s blog at https://hollywoodconsumer.wordpress.com/ Continue reading

POP ART: Episode 41, Tootsie/Some Like It Hot


GENDER BENDER. “Nobody’s perfect.” Are you sure that person sitting across from you is male? Are you sure the person sitting next to you is female? They say clothes make the man. But do they? Or do clothes make the woman? Well, whatever the answer is, it sounds like it’s time for Episode 41 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For my listeners, please like, follow or comment. Today, I am happy to welcome writer/producer/director/novelist #DwayneAlexanderSmith, who has chosen the gender bending farce and Dustin Hoffman vehicle, Tootsie, and I have chosen the Billy Wilder/IAL Diamond classic, Jack Lemon/Tony Curtis comedy, Some Like it Hot, both about men who disguise themselves as women and try to pass. And in this episode, we answer such questions as: What is a Tootsie shot? What is the greatest last line in movie history? What held up the release of Tootsie? What does Some Like it Hot mean? Is Tootsie mansplaining? What did Cary Grant think of Tony Curtis in Some Like it Hot? Why does Bill Murray not have a credit at the beginning of the movie? What is historically inaccurate about the costumes in Some Like it Hot?

Check out Dwayne’s IMDB credits and his films via https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0808051/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0

And his books at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=dwayne+alexander+smith&i=stripbooks&crid=2CXZXXA8I6TM4&sprefix=dwayne+alexan%2Caps%2C210&ref=nb_sb_ss_c_3_13_ts-doa-p especially Forty Acres about to be a major motion picture Continue reading

POP ART: Episode 40, Dead Calm/Knife in the Water


STRANGER DANGER. “I left the cucumbers behind” Our mothers always warned us. Always wear clean underwear. Always finish the food on your plate, there are children starving in other countries. Never pick up strangers. But do we listen to her? Of course, not. And because of that, we have to pay the penalty. Sounds like the perfect time for Episode 40 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For my listeners, please like, follow or comment. For this episode, I welcome writer/producer/director Robert Brody, who has chosen the Nicole Kidman, San Neill, Billy Zane three-handed thriller Dead Calm, and I have chosen Roman Polanski’s freshman feature, the Polish arthouse classic Knife in the Water, both about a couple who pick up a stranger and find themselves in sexual and physical conflict while on a boat at sea. And in this episode, we answer such questions as: Why do you never ask Billy Zane to go boating? Who dubbed the voice of the hitchhiker in Knife in the Water and why? What are the technical accuracies and inaccuracies of both movies? How and why did they change the ending to Dead Calm? What is significant about Knife in the Water and the Oscars? Why didn’t Polanski remake Knife in the Water in Hollywood?

And be sure and stay tuned to the end where Robert very generously gives me a wonderful recommendation for my coverage service. Thank you, Robert. Continue reading

POP ART: Episode 39, Superbad/American Graffiti


NEW EPISODE: SCHOOL DAZE: “Where were you in ‘62” We’ve all been there. And it was a nightmare of monumental proportions. A time of nihilistic and existential dread. A period of fear and trembling and sickness unto death. Or as it is better known: finishing high school and leaving for college.  Sounds like the perfect time for Episode 40 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture, and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For my listeners, please like, follow or comment. Today, I am happy to welcome actor/voice over artist Charley Rossman, who has chosen the farcical coming of age Michael Cera/Jonah Hill movie, Superbad, (Charley plays the Security Guard at Good Shopper), and I have chosen George Lucas’s instant classic, American Graffiti, both about characters having to make some life changing decisions in their last year before college. Ah, good times, good times. And in this episode we answer such questions as: How are women treated in films like this? What had to happen in order for Christopher Mintz-Plasse to do his sex scene? Why was American Graffiti almost released to television? Is the ending to Superbad believable? Why didn’t Elvis Presley have any of his songs used in American Graffiti? What line from Superbad became a popular ringtone?

In the meantime, check out Charley Rossman’s IMDB page at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0744451/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0

And two of his recent films:

This Way Up https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rbxD31BawNg&feature=youtu.be 

 Ex-Mas exmasfilm.com https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rbxD31BawNg&feature=youtu.be

Meanwhile, like, follow or comment on my podcast. I’ve love to know what you think. And check out the other episodes. On ITUNES and PODOMATIC. https://podcasts.apple.com/…/pop-art/id1511098925and https://hcasner65579.podomatic.com/, Anchor: https://anchor.fm/howard-casner, as well as iheartradio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-pop-art-65365716/, Sticher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/pop-art Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5jX4noVGArDJdmcFtmrQcGm , Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/…, Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/pop-art, Pocketcasts: https://pca.st/vfjqj6j6, Radiopublic: https://radiopublic.com/pop-art-GExxNb

Continue reading

POP ART: Episode 38, Go/71 Fragments of a Chronicle of Chance


FANCY MEETING YOU HERE: “Wait. You want us to sell Amway?” How much does chance play in our lives and what happens to us? How much does it play when it comes to our interaction with strangers? Or when we or others are the victims of seemingly sudden and random acts of violence?  Sounds like the perfect time for Episode 38 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture, and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For my listeners, please like, follow or comment. Today, I am happy to welcome back film enthusiast and podcaster of Cinemarecall, The Vern, who has chosen the dark comic riff on Pulp Fiction, the cult classic Go, where I have chosen Michael Haneke’s Austrian art house classic 71 Fragments of a Chronicle of Chance, two films about three disparate groups of people whose paths cross due to shocking acts of violence during the holidays. So, Merry Xmas, I guess. And in this episode we answer such questions as: What was Melissa McCarthy and Sebastian Stan’s first film? What did the grocery store where Go was filmed do to cause the filmmakers consternation? What does Killer Condom have to do with it? How is Family Guy like a Haneke film? In what show did Scott Wolf and Jay Mohr reunite?

Meanwhile look up The Vern’s podcast CinemaRecall at Cinemarecall.net. Continue reading