POP ART: Episode 45, True Romance/Pierrot le Fou


THE COURSE OF TRUE LOVE NEVER DID RUN SMOOTH: “Okie, dokey, doggie daddy.” We’ve all been there, done that. We meet someone. Fall in love. Pledge our lives to each other. Then, as so often happens, we kill someone or rob someone of drugs or money and have to go on the run. Who hasn’t found themselves in that situation? Sounds like it’s time for Episode 45 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, I am happy to welcome fellow podcaster Jarrett Galante, aka Clark F. Gable, who has chosen the Tony Scott/Quentin Tarantino neo-noir, True Romance, and I have chosen the quite different Jean Luc Godard French film classic, Pierrot le Fou, both about lovers on the run.

And in this episode, we answer such questions as: What did Tarantino do to raise money to make Reservoir Dogs and how does Elvis fit in? Are Tarantino and Godard post-modern or post-post-modern? How does the movie Pineapple Express fit in? Who is Sam Fuller and would you want to be one? Where did the Sicilian story come from in True Romance? Where does Godard stand in the pantheon of directors? Where does Tarantino? What are the differences between the original screenplay and the final one in True Romance and what did Tarantino think about it? Where did the True Romance theme come from?

Meanwhile check out Jarrett’s podcast The REAL Short Box at https://www.facebook.com/therealshortbox/

And Jarrett’s IDMB profile at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm1445425/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Continue reading

GAY BY GAY: Moonlight, Closet Monster and King Cobra


For questions: hcasner@aol.com
First, a word from our sponsors: I wanted to say thank you to everyone who contributed to our Indiegogo campaign for 15 Conversations in 10 Minutes. We did very well due to you folks. For those who weren’t able to give, keep us in your thoughts. And if you are able to contribute in the future, contact me and I’ll tell you how. I will even honor the perks on the original campaign.
I am now offering a new consultation service: so much emphasis has been given lately to the importance of the opening of your screenplay, I now offer coverage for the first twenty pages at the cost of $20.00.  For those who don’t want to have full coverage on their screenplay at this time, but want to know how well their script is working with the opening pages, this is perfect for you.  I’ll help you not lose the reader on page one. 
 
Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay?  FosCheck out my new e-book published on Amazon: Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, including my series of essays, What I Learned Reading for Contests This Year, and my film reviews of 2013.  Only $2.99. http://ow.ly/xN31r
 
and check out my Script Consultation Services: http://ow.ly/HPxKE
Warning: SPOILERS
rev-1For new screenwriters, the niche marketplace is important because it’s not unusual for that to be a stepping stone for up and comers to bigger budgets and more ambitious projects.
For gays and lesbians, it’s doubly important because it gives us a series of films where the central character dying at the end isn’t a requirement for the acceptance of the story (although that can make it more difficult for an actor to get an Oscar nom-#oscarssowhite just loves a nice helping of #oscarsgayssodead).
There have been three movies of late (well, four, but I reviewed The Handmaiden in another post) that are niche films that have a special appeal to the LGBTQ community. Two are what are called coming out films. The other is decidedly not. Continue reading

SEX AND THE SINGLE GIRL: Nymphomaniac: Vol. 1 and Under the Skin


Nymphomaniac-Vol-1I feel I should start this review with full disclosure. I do not like the movies of Lars von Trier, I do not like them, Sam I Am. I find them preposterous, ridiculous, over the top, impossible to connect with emotionally, and, most importantly, just plain boring the vast majority of the time.   I only keep seeing them because of the critical reception his movies receive and the reputation he has within the film community; so I realize that attention must be paid.
But I’m sorry, he just doesn’t work for me. Continue reading