POP ART: Episode 7-Singin’ in the Rain/Irma Vep


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Been seeing a lot of films during the quarantine? Then what better time to listen to a podcast about movies that are about making movies? In Pop Art, my guest chooses a movie from pop culture and I choose a film from the art/classic side of cinema and in Episode 7, my guest, Adam Ferenz, host of the Cathode Ray Mission, chose the musical classic of infinite grace Singin’ in the Rain, while I, in turn, chose a classic of Olivier Assayas’ oeuvre, Irma Vep. And here we discuss such issues as how did Singin’ in the Rain move from pop culture to art status? Who steals the movie? What do these films have to say about the making of movies in their own culture? Who or what is a Madge Blake? And how does Batman fit in? Enjoy. And don’t forget to LIKE, COMMENT and FOLLOW. You can find Episode 7 and other episodes at Podomatic https://hcasner65579.podomatic.com/, Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5jX4noVGArDJdmcFtmrQcGm , Anchor: https://anchor.fm/howard-casner, Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/…, Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/pop-art, Pocketcasts: https://pca.st/vfjqj6j6, Radiopublic: https://radiopublic.com/pop-art-GExxNb, Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/you/tracks

Previous episodes: Raiders of the Lost Ark/The Treasure of the Sierra Madre; Goldfinger/The Spy Who Came in From the Cold; Monty Python and the Holy Grail/The Seventh Seal; The Great Escape/A Man Escaped; Best in Show/Series 7: The Contenders; Robocop/THX 1138

 

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Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay?  Check out the second edition of my screenwriting book, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader published on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GD1XP9Y

Finally, I have published a collection of three of my plays, 3 Plays, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08478DBXF as well as two collections of short stories, The Starving Artists and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FS91CKJ and The Five Corporations and the One True Church and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07KY5Z3CF.

IMMORTALITY: Hitchcock/Truffaut and He Never Died


First, a word from our sponsors: I am now offering a new service: so much emphasis has been given lately to the importance of the opening of your screenplay, I now offer coverage for the first twenty pages at the cost of $20.00.  For those who don’t want to have full coverage on their screenplay at this time, but want to know how well their script is working with the opening pages, this is perfect for you.  I’ll help you not lose the reader on page one. 

 

Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay? Check out my new e-book published on Amazon: Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, including my series of essays, What I Learned Reading for Contests This Year, and my film reviews of 2013. Only $2.99. http://ow.ly/xN31r

 

and check out my Script Consultation Services: http://ow.ly/HPxKE

Warning: SPOILERS

hitch 1One of the great Woody Allen’s more well-known quotes is his musings on the end of life. He said: “I don’t want to achieve immortality through my work; I want to achieve immortality through not dying”.

Recently, two films have played in which the central characters achieved immortality in one of those ways.

The documentary Hitchcock/Truffaut is based upon a series of interviews that the great New Wave French filmmaker, Francois Truffaut, had with one of his most important influences, the more polished Hollywood filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock.

It was an attempt in a way to save the master of suspense. Up until then, though considered one of the most reliable and successful filmmakers of histime, Hitchcock still really wasn’t taken as seriously as he is now for the simple reason in that he made “thrillers”, a genre that was not considered something that filmmakers who took the art form seriously entered into (back in 1940, Gary Cooper turned down the lead in Foreign Correspondent, a role that went to Joel McCrea, because he felt that this genre of film was unimportant and beneath him—a decision he said later was his greatest mistake). Continue reading

My recommendations for movie watching this week in L.A. 5/1/2015-5/8/2015


First, a word from our sponsors. Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay? Check out my e-book published on Amazon: Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, including my series of essays, What I Learned Reading for Contests This Year. Only $2.99. http://ow.ly/xN31r,
 
And check out my script consultation services http://ow.ly/HPxKE
My recommendations for movie watching this week in L.A. 5/1-5/8/2015
hot fuzzON NETFLIX: HOT FUZZ, written by the star Simon Pegg and the director Edgar Wright, is a satire of both buddy cop movies and a peculiarly British genre, the dirty dealings going on in a small, sleepy country village. Very funny and often inspired (especially the opening). A fun romp.
shootON HULU: SHOOT THE PIANO PLAYER, written by Marcel Moussy and the director Francois Truffaut (from the novel Down There by David Goodis) is Truffaut’s first feature after his debut The 400 Blows. It’s also his first foray into post noir in this story of a piano player who in a bar who helps his brother who is being pursued by two mobsters. One of Truffaut’s finest films. Continue reading

WOMEN IN UNREQUITED LOVE: Violette


First, a word from our sponsors. Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay? Check out my new e-book published on Amazon: Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, including my series of essays, What I Learned Reading for Contests This Year, and my film reviews of 2013. Only $2.99. http://ow.ly/xN31r

Warning: SPOILERS
Violette_1_largeViolette, the new biopic of French feminist writer Violette Leduc (she was a contemporary of Simone de Beauvoir, Jean Paul Sartre and Jean Genet), is a beautiful film to watch. From a technical standpoint, I think anyone would be hard pressed to find much fault with it. The cinematography is gorgeously, if not depressingly, dark; the sets and costumes faithfully rendered; the music score is enticing; the story is never uninteresting.
At the same time, when it was over, I have to be honest and say that I never really had an emotional connection to the title character. Continue reading