POP ART: Episode 45, True Romance/Pierrot le Fou


THE COURSE OF TRUE LOVE NEVER DID RUN SMOOTH: “Okie, dokey, doggie daddy.” We’ve all been there, done that. We meet someone. Fall in love. Pledge our lives to each other. Then, as so often happens, we kill someone or rob someone of drugs or money and have to go on the run. Who hasn’t found themselves in that situation? Sounds like it’s time for Episode 45 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, I am happy to welcome fellow podcaster Jarrett Galante, aka Clark F. Gable, who has chosen the Tony Scott/Quentin Tarantino neo-noir, True Romance, and I have chosen the quite different Jean Luc Godard French film classic, Pierrot le Fou, both about lovers on the run.

And in this episode, we answer such questions as: What did Tarantino do to raise money to make Reservoir Dogs and how does Elvis fit in? Are Tarantino and Godard post-modern or post-post-modern? How does the movie Pineapple Express fit in? Who is Sam Fuller and would you want to be one? Where did the Sicilian story come from in True Romance? Where does Godard stand in the pantheon of directors? Where does Tarantino? What are the differences between the original screenplay and the final one in True Romance and what did Tarantino think about it? Where did the True Romance theme come from?

Meanwhile check out Jarrett’s podcast The REAL Short Box at https://www.facebook.com/therealshortbox/

And Jarrett’s IDMB profile at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm1445425/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Continue reading

…AND THE REST


For questions: hcasner@aol.com
First, a word from our sponsors: I am now offering a new service: so much emphasis has been given lately to the importance of the opening of your screenplay, I now offer coverage for the first twenty pages at the cost of $20.00.  For those who don’t want to have full coverage on their screenplay at this time, but want to know how well their script is working with the opening pages, this is perfect for you.  I’ll help you not lose the reader on page one. 
 
Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay?  Check out my new e-book published on Amazon: Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, including my series of essays, What I Learned Reading for Contests This Year, and my film reviews of 2013.  Only $2.99. http://ow.ly/xN31r
 
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Warning: SPOILERS
I have now gotten so far behind in my film reviewing, I was despairing of ever finishing them for 2017. To remedy that, I will be writing quick and short reviews and include them all in this post as they are done.
Call Me By Your Name is an exquisite film with an exquisite story that has an unhappy ending because it wouldn’t be nearly as exquisite if it didn’t, and is based upon an exquisite novel by Andre Aciman (actually, I haven’t read it, so I’m just guessing). The exquisite screenplay, by James Ivory, the legendary writer/director/producer of the legendary films from the legendary Ivory/Merchant production company, is about an affair between a 17-year old Italian American from a scholarly family living in the Italian countryside and a 24-year old grad student visiting the family. It’s deeply felt, deeply emotional, and a deeply rewarding film experience. Deeply and exquisitely directed by Luca Guadagnino, deeply and exquisitely. With Timothee Chalomet as the teen, Arnmie Hammer as the older student and Michael Stuhlbarg as the empathetic father. Deeply exquisite. Continue reading

IT’S NOT THE SIZE, IT’S WHAT YOU DO WITH IT: Child 44 and Unfriended


First, a word from our sponsors. Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay? Check out my new e-book published on Amazon: Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, including my series of essays, What I Learned Reading for Contests This Year, and my film reviews of 2013. Only $2.99. http://ow.ly/xN31r
 
and check out my Script Consultation Services: http://ow.ly/HPxKE
 
Warning: SPOILERS
child 44 twoChild 44, the new mystery thriller that is about the hunt for a serial killer in post-World War II Soviet Union, has received terrible reviews. I mean, horrendous in some cases. It’s at 25% at rottentomatoes. And very few, so far, have had much too good to say about it.
Well, I’m here to suggest that maybe the movie is being a bit maligned.
That is not to say I think it’s great. I definitely do not believe it quite succeeds on its own terms or rises above what it is.
And it’s also possible that I went in expecting the worst, only to be pleasantly surprised. That’s certainly happened to all of us at one time or another.
But still, I think there is much to like here, especially if you are a fan of neo-noir or crime dramas. Continue reading

APEOCALYPSE NOW, OR OF APES BOTH NAKED AND HAIRY: Venus in Fur, Life Itself and Dawn of the Planet of the Apes


First, a word from our sponsors. Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay? Check out my new e-book published on Amazon: Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, including my series of essays, What I Learned Reading for Contests This Year, and my film reviews of 2013. Only $2.99. http://ow.ly/xN31r
Warning: SPOILERS
venusThe new movie, Venus in Fur, co-written by bad boy old timer Roman Polanski (who also directed) with relative new comer David Ives, from a play by Ives that was influenced by a book by Leopold von Sacher-Masoch (yeah, that Sacher-Masoch—oh, no, don’t even try it, you know very well whom I’m talking about, you can’t fool me), begins during a somewhat impressionistic rain storm on a deserted street in France (so I guess the slight touch of impressionism shouldn’t be a surprise) backed by a music score of sublime slyness.
In fact, the score is so sublime, so sly, so clever, so flippant, so wicked, so…well, just so everything that I found myself being driven crazy because I couldn’t place the composer. And then at the end, during the credits, there it is—the name Alexandre Desplat, and all I could think was, of course, who else could it possibly have been. Continue reading