POP ART: Episode 59, Memento/Spellbound


NEW POP ART EPISODE: Join teacher by day, horror aficionado by night Lisa Leaheey as we talk Memento and Spellbound. Meanwhile, please like, follow and spread the news about the podcast.

MEMORIES OF MURDER: “I have a condition”. You forget your keys? No big deal. You forget where you parked your car? It’s okay, you’ll find it. You forget your phone? Well, not good, but still… It happens. But forget whether you murdered someone or not and just watch as all hell breaks loose. Sounds like it’s time for Episode 59 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture, and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. This time round, I am happy to welcome as my guest, teacher by day, horror aficionado by night and someone who makes a career of being on other people’s podcasts, Lisa Leaheey, who has chosen as her film the Christopher Nolan mind bending neo-noir Memento, while I have chosen the classic Alfred Hitchcock psychological thriller Spellbound, both about people who may have…oh, I forget.

And in this episode we answer such questions as: Is the structure of Memento a gimmick or a conceit? What six Hitchcock films was Leo G. Carroll in? What is the major plot hole in Memento? What is a theremin and would you want to be one? What are some other stories with unusual structures? What’s odd about Teddy’s driver’s license and telephone number? Who is Michael Chekov related to? What is it about that skiing scene?

Check out Between the Scares with Lisa Leaheey at Whatever With Jason Soto at https://open.spotify.com/episode/7a0hdhkumnnpXH0CAYr33i

And check out her upcoming podcast The SibList at https://www.facebook.com/The-SibList-109714494695206 soon to be at rabbitholepodcasts.com

Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/

My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss

Meanwhile, like, follow or comment on my podcast. I’d love to know what you think. And check out the other episodes. On ITUNES and PODOMATIC. https://podcasts.apple.com/…/pop-art/id1511098925and https://hcasner65579.podomatic.com/, Anchor: https://anchor.fm/howard-casner, and Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/5jX4noVGArDJdmcFtmrQcG , Sticher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/pop-art, Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/…, Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/pop-art, Pocketcasts: https://pca.st/vfjqj6j6, Radiopublic: https://radiopublic.com/pop-art-GExxNb and other streaming sites

MAKING A KILLING: The Killing of a Sacred Deer, Murder on the Orient Express


First, a word from our sponsors: I am now offering a new consultation service: so much emphasis has been given lately to the importance of the opening of your screenplay, I now offer coverage for the first twenty pages at the cost of $20.00.  For those who don’t want to have full coverage on their screenplay at this time, but want to know how well their script is working with the opening pages, this is perfect for you.  I’ll help you not lose the reader on page one. 
 
Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay?  FosCheck out my new e-book published on Amazon: Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, including my series of essays, What I Learned Reading for Contests This Year, and my film reviews of 2013.  Only $2.99. http://ow.ly/xN31r
 
and check out my Script Consultation Services: http://ow.ly/HPxKE
Warning: SPOILERS
When I saw writer/director Yorgos Lanthimos and writer Efthymis Filippou’s earlier film Dogtooth, I must be honest and say I didn’t have the most favorable reaction and many might consider that odd.
I felt it a rather dated attack on middle class mores that had already been done to death in the 1950’s and 60’s, especially in the off-Broadway theater.
But then I saw The Lobster, their last film, an hysterical satire and social commentary on love and relationships and the society that promotes them.
And now I’ve seen their latest, The Killing of a Sacred Deer, and I realized I was partially right about my earlier analysis because the more I see of their work, the more I realize the turgid social commentary of those decades are not their main influences. Rather, these two artists are the 21st Century embodiment of the existentialist/theater of the absurd practitioners like Beckett, Ionesco, Sartre, Albee and others of that ilk. Continue reading