POP ART: Episode 72, Tombstone/My Darling Clementine


POP ART, WHERE I FIND THE POP CULTURE IN ART AND THE ART IN POP CULTURE: HIT AND MYTH

“I’m you’re huckleberry.” In John Ford’s movie The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, we have the famous line, “This is the West, sir. When the legend becomes fact, print the legend.”  Sounds like it’s time for Episode 72 of Pop Art, the podcast where we find the pop culture in art and the art in pop culture. On Pop Art, my guest chooses a movie from popular culture, and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, I am happy to welcome back as my guest film enthusiast and fellow podcaster Todd Liebenow, who has chosen as his selection the epic 1990s version of Wyatt Earp, the widescreen Tombstone, while I have chosen the John Ford classic, My Darling Clementine, both about the mythical figure of the Earp brothers and the gunfight at the OK Corral.

And in this episode, we’ll ask the questions: Where did the gunfight at the OK Corral take place? What is it about westerns, anyway? Who directed Tombstone? Are you sure? Whose favorite movie is My Darling Clementine? Who is Kevin Jarre’s famous step-father? What did director John Ford think of My Darling Clementine? Who does the term “cowboy” refer to? What is a Mae Marsh and would you want to be one? Why does Robert Mitchum do the voiceover?

Check out Todd’s blog Forgotten Films at https://forgottenfilmcast.wordpress.com/

And his podcast at https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/forgotten-filmcast/id620200136

Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/

My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss

Meanwhile, like, follow or comment on my podcast. I’d love to know what you think. And check out the other episodes. On ITUNES and PODOMATIC. https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/pop-art/id1511098925 & https://hcasner65579.podomatic.com/, Anchor: https://anchor.fm/howard-casner, and Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/5jX4noVGArDJdmcFtmrQcG , Sticher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/pop-art, Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/…, Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/pop-art, Pocketcasts: https://pca.st/vfjqj6j6, Radiopublic: https://radiopublic.com/pop-art-GExxNb and other streaming sites

Check out my Script Consultation Services at http://ow.ly/HPxKE. I offer several types of service. Testimonials can be found at the blog entry.

Finally, I have published a collection of three of my plays, 3 Plays, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08478DBXF as well as two collections of short stories, The Starving Artists and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FS91CKJ and The Five Corporations and the One True Church and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07KY5Z3CF.

Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay?  Check out the second edition of my screenwriting book, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader published on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GD1XP9Y

POP ART: Episode 34, Big Trouble in Little China/That Man From Rio


NOW YOU SEE ‘EM, NOW YOU DON’T-“This is Jack Burton in the Pork Chop Express.” What would you do if someone was kidnapped, abducted right in front of you? What if you loved this person? What if this person was your fiancé? What if it was your truck? That’s right. It sounds like the perfect time for Episode 34 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. For this episode, I am happy to welcome movie hyphenate, actor, director, writer, producer, stuntman and podcaster, Darin Munnell, who has chosen John Carpenter’s martial arts cult comedy classic, Big Trouble in Little China, and I have chosen French director, Philippe de Broca’s whimsical thriller/comedy spoof That Man From Rio, both about characters who see their fiancés, and a truck, abducted right before their eyes and go on an adventure to get them back. And in this episode we answer such questions as: Why did John Carpenter say he’ll never work for the studios again? How did That Man in Rio possibly influence Raiders of the Lost Arc? Who else auditioned for Sulu in Star Trek? How does James Bond fit in? Is there a structural problem with Big Trouble in Little China? And does it work anyway? What happens in the uncut ending to Big Trouble…?

And check out Darin’s other projects:

Lone Wolf McCray, a webseries https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt5IfMB9GUBk74eIR5I-MgA

Pineapple Insurance,  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FrRJpLoVBI

The Real Short Box, http://www.rumblespoon.com/wp/index/ Continue reading

OEDIPUS WRECKS or DADDY DEAREST: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2


First, a word from our sponsors: I wanted to say thank you to everyone who contributed to our Indiegogo campaign for 15 Conversations in 10 Minutes. We did very well due to you folks. For those who weren’t able to give, keep us in your thoughts. And if you are able to contribute in the future, contact me and I’ll tell you how. I will even honor the perks on the original campaign.
I am now offering a new consultation service: so much emphasis has been given lately to the importance of the opening of your screenplay, I now offer coverage for the first twenty pages at the cost of $20.00.  For those who don’t want to have full coverage on their screenplay at this time, but want to know how well their script is working with the opening pages, this is perfect for you.  I’ll help you not lose the reader on page one. 
 
Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay?  FosCheck out my new e-book published on Amazon: Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, including my series of essays, What I Learned Reading for Contests This Year, and my film reviews of 2013.  Only $2.99. http://ow.ly/xN31r
 
and check out my Script Consultation Services: http://ow.ly/HPxKE
Warning: SPOILERS
Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 is superior to the fun and frolicsome first entry in the franchise if, for no other reason, than the casting of Kurt Russell, former Disney waif turned cult actor, who has managed, somehow, to bridge the cinematic generation gap (previously by appearing in Furious 7, now by becoming a Marvel supervillain) and, like Donald Sutherland in The Hunger Games, become relevant again.
And Quentin Tarantino certainly hasn’t hurt his career any.
And it’s also interesting that it is happening just as his significant other seems to be doing the same by co-starring in the more successful than expected Amy Schumacher vehicle, Snatched.
I’m always ready to spread out the welcome mat for Russell and here he seems to be having the time of his life playing a maniacal psychopath with a God complex (appropriately named Ego no less) and the powers to back it up. Continue reading

IT’S A DISASTER: The Magnificent Seven and Deepwater Horizon


For questions: hcasner@aol.com
First, a word from our sponsors: I wanted to say thank you to everyone who contributed to our Indiegogo campaign for 15 Conversations in 10 Minutes. We did very well due to you folks. For those who weren’t able to give, keep us in your thoughts. And if you are able to contribute in the future, contact me and I’ll tell you how. I will even honor the perks on the original campaign.
I am now offering a new consultation service: so much emphasis has been given lately to the importance of the opening of your screenplay, I now offer coverage for the first twenty pages at the cost of $20.00.  For those who don’t want to have full coverage on their screenplay at this time, but want to know how well their script is working with the opening pages, this is perfect for you.  I’ll help you not lose the reader on page one. 
 
Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay?  FosCheck out my new e-book published on Amazon: Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, including my series of essays, What I Learned Reading for Contests This Year, and my film reviews of 2013.  Only $2.99. http://ow.ly/xN31r
 
and check out my Script Consultation Services: http://ow.ly/HPxKE
Warning: SPOILERS
rev-1Two films have opened as of late which have disaster in common. One falls into that genre and one almost is one.
There is one transcendent moment in the most recent version of The Magnificent Seven. It comes at the end as the credits begin by showing each of the characters. At this point, behind them, one can here the incredibly epic score by Elmer Bernstein from the 1960 version. It’s stirring, splendid, glorious, stunning…
Unfortunately, this tiny fraction of the movie only really ended up serving one purpose: it clearly reminded the audience of the earlier version, and not to the benefit of the present one, and only went to show how bland and uninteresting the music is when it comes to James Horner and Simon Franklin’s score for this Western remake of a remake (yes, it apparently took two people to come up with something so dull). Continue reading

A BIT SHORT: The Big Short and The Hateful Eight


First, a word from our sponsors: I am now offering a new service: so much emphasis has been given lately to the importance of the opening of your screenplay, I now offer coverage for the first twenty pages at the cost of $20.00.  For those who don’t want to have full coverage on their screenplay at this time, but want to know how well their script is working with the opening pages, this is perfect for you.  I’ll help you not lose the reader on page one. 

 

Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay? Check out my new e-book published on Amazon: Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, including my series of essays, What I Learned Reading for Contests This Year, and my film reviews of 2013. Only $2.99. http://ow.ly/xN31r

 

and check out my Script Consultation Services: http://ow.ly/HPxKE

Warning: SPOILERS

big short 1The Big Short, like Spotlight, is the one of those movies ripped from the headlines—of years and years ago; but this time the subject is not pedophile priests, but the downfall of the American economy. Written by Charles Randolph and the director Adam McKay, from a book by Michael Lewis, it’s also a very satisfying bit of agitprop theater with Brechtian distancing devices thrown in for good major.

It basically tells the story of four different groups of people who all realized, more or less at the same time, and years ahead of schedule, that the housing mortgage bubble was going to burst in 2007 and destroy the world’s economy.

This leads to the movie’s major irony: the people who figured this out then proceed to invest heavily against the U.S. economy, making tons of money when their Cassandra like prediction of doom came true.

So basically, we in the audience, along with the characters in the movie, find ourselves and themselves actually hoping that the U.S. financial system tanks like the Titanic. Continue reading

THE THRILLERS OF IT ALL, PART DEUX: Furious 7 and Kumiko, The Treasure Hunter


First, a word from our sponsors. Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay? Check out my new e-book published on Amazon: Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, including my series of essays, What I Learned Reading for Contests This Year, and my film reviews of 2013. Only $2.99. http://ow.ly/xN31r
 
and check out my Script Consultation Services: http://ow.ly/HPxKE
 
Warning: SPOILERS
furious 7Okay, I admit it. It got me. Furious 7, the latest entrée in the fast car, not so fast women (the film is surprisingly family focused) franchise, and its tribute to the late Paul Walker brought more than a wee tear to my eye.
How could it not?
However, before I go into any more detail here, full disclosure: I have never seen a Fast and Furious movie before.
That’s right. Zip. Nada. Not a single one.
So, take that into account before taking seriously anything I have to say.
Furious 7 is, well, let’s face it: it’s ridiculous, often cheesy, over the top, clunky.   In fact, one could make a sound argument that it’s really not a very good film at all.
Still, it’s a ton of fun. It more than gets the adrenaline going. It has so much electric energy that if someone had a heart attack in the theater, the movie alone could get the organ pumping again. Continue reading