Plague/Schmague: Episode 3 of Pop Art-Monty Python and the Holy Grail/The Seventh Seal


What better time to discuss two films that take place during a plague?

For Pop Art, I ask my guest to chose a film from pop culture and I will then chose a corresponding film from the more arty side of cinema.

For this episode, my guest Jay Cluitt chose the brilliant comedy Monty Python and the Holy Grail and I, in turn, chose the great Ingmar Bergman’s art house hit The Seventh Seal. And in this episode we answer such questions as: Who is the best Monty Pythoner; which movie has the best insult scenes; how does an acting troupe survive in a plague; where have all the existentialists gone; and what is the connection between Bergman and Twister?

Find it at https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/hcasner65579

 

And check out my first two episodes: Raiders of the Lost Ark/The Treasure of the Sierra Madre and Goldfinger/The Spy Who Came in From the Cold.

 

PASSING THE LIGHTSABER: Star Wars: The Force Awakens


First, a word from our sponsors: I am now offering a new service: so much emphasis has been given lately to the importance of the opening of your screenplay, I now offer coverage for the first twenty pages at the cost of $20.00.  For those who don’t want to have full coverage on their screenplay at this time, but want to know how well their script is working with the opening pages, this is perfect for you.  I’ll help you not lose the reader on page one. 

 

Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay? Check out my new e-book published on Amazon: Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, including my series of essays, What I Learned Reading for Contests This Year, and my film reviews of 2013. Only $2.99. http://ow.ly/xN31r

 

and check out my Script Consultation Services: http://ow.ly/HPxKE

Warning: SPOILERS

 

 

sw 3The new Star Wars film (Star Wars: the Force Awakens to be exact) has a simple theme: the only thing that can stop a bad guy with the force is a good guy with the force.

All in all, I would have to say that this new entry in the franchise is both better than the original Star Wars and not as good as the original Star Wars.

It’s better acted than what is now known as A New Hope; the dialog is a bit more pithy and witty; the characters are somewhat less one-dimensional; and the special effects less cheesy.

But there’s one thing the original space opera had that the new one doesn’t, can’t and will never have. Continue reading