POP ART, EPISODE 56: Streets of Fire/The Professionals


 NAPPED TIME: “Tonight is the night to be young.” Don’t you hate when this happen? Someone abducts a loved one. Takes them far away. And you have to go after them and bring them back. And you haven’t even had your coffee yet. Sounds like it’s time for Episode 56 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture, and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. For this episode, I am happy to welcome as my guest, TV producer Casey O’Connor (Ridiculousness), who has chosen the Walter Hill rock and roll action film, Streets and Fire, while I have chosen Richard Brooks revisionist western and Burt Lancaster vehicle, The Professionals, both films inspired by the Iliad in which a group of people are sent to retrieve a loved one who has been abducted.

And in this episode, we answer such questions as: Why did Streets of Fire lose money? What was odd about Diane Lane’s age in Streets of Fire? What is revisionist about The Professionals? How did Amy Madigan’s role change once she was cast? What was odd about the directing category of the 1967 Oscars? Where did the title of Streets of Fire come from and what happened in connection to it? What was the ninth most popular movie at the French box office in 1966? What famous comedian can be seen as an extra in Streets of Fire? What is Richard Brooks most lasting contribution to film noir and what did the censors do? Which song from Streets of Fire became a top 10 Billboard hit in 1984? What is the Blasters and would you want to be one?

Be sure and check out Casey’s show on MTV: Ridiculousness

And check out his cool lamps made from VHS tapes at https://www.voltagevhs.com/

Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/

My books, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader, The Starving Artists and Other Stories and The Five Corporations and One True Religion can be found at https://www.amazon.com/s?k=howard+casner&ref=nb_sb_noss

Continue reading

POP ART: EPISODE 52, INDIANA JONES AND THE TEMPLE OF DOOM/GUNGA DIN


HIP HIP HOORAJ: “Kill for the love of Kali.” It happens over and over again. You conquer a country. Make it part of your empire. Teach them to be just like you while not giving them any real freedom or self-determination. And in response, all you expect is a little gratitude—plus the vast majority of their resources for your own exploitation. But in return, what do you get—all they do is grumble, complain and commit mass murder. Sigh. Sounds like it’s time for Episode 52 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest will choose a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic/indie side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, I am happy to welcome as my guest, filmmaker Micky Levy. Micky has chosen the second entry in the Indian Jones franchise, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, while I have chosen the George Stevens, Rudyard Kipling inspired classic, Gunga Din, both inspired by the Raj in India and a rebellious cult called The Thuggees.

And in this episode we answer such questions as: Why did nobody involved like Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom? Who did they want for the role of Gunga Din first? What joke was played on Spielberg during the filming of the final scenes? How did Cary Grant get cast as Cutter? What effect did Temple of Doom have on the ratings system? What did Bertolt Brecht, T.S. Eliot and George Orwell say about Gunga Din and Rudyard Kipling? What happened to the characters of Willie Scott and Short Round? Why was Kipling cut from the original version of Gunga Din?

Check out Micky’s IMDB listing at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0506551/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0

And her film Rails & Ties, available on various streaming platforms

Check out my blog at https://howardcasner.wordpress.com/

Continue reading

POP ART: Episode 19, Finding Nemo/The Searchers


“That’ll be the day.” Concerned about your kids these days? Wondering about their safety? Just how far would you go to keep them safe? Who would you rather come after you if you are abducted? Ethan Edwards or Marlin? The perfect time for Episode 18 of Pop Art, the podcast where my guest chooses a movie from popular culture and I’ll select a film from the more art/classic side of cinema with a connection to it. This time, my guest, blogger and film reviewer Drew of Drew’s Movie Reviews, has chosen the Pixar/Disney animated classic and ironic fish out of water film Finding Nemo, while I have chosen the John Ford/John Wayne classic western The Searchers, both with adults who are looking for abducted children. And here we answer such questions as: Why were Albert Brooks and Ellen DeGeneres cast in the movie? What makes Pixar movies so special? What makes The Searchers a great movie…or is it one? How does the Batcave come into all this? Why was the shark named Bruce? Should Andy Serkis get an Oscar? How many Hitchcock references can you name? And what is John Wayne’s real name?

Meanwhile, listen to other episodes as well as comment on and follow ON ITUNES AND PODOMATIC. https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/pop-art/id1511098925 and https://hcasner65579.podomatic.com/, as well as iheartradio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-pop-art-65365716/, Sticher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/pop-art Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5jX4noVGArDJdmcFtmrQcGm , Anchor: https://anchor.fm/howard-casner, Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy8xZWI4N2NmYy9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw , Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/pop-art, Pocketcasts: https://pca.st/vfjqj6j6, Radiopublic: https://radiopublic.com/pop-art-GExxNb

Previous episodes: Raiders of the Lost Ark/The Treasure of the Sierra Madre; Goldfinger/The Spy Who Came in From the Cold; Monty Python and the Holy Grail/The Seventh Seal; The Great Escape/A Man Escaped; Best in Show/Series 7: The Contenders; Robocop/THX 1138; Singin’ in the Rain/Irma Vep; Star Wars/The Hidden Fortress; The Omen/Village of the Damned; Aliens/Attack the Block; Adaptation/Sunset Boulevard; Die Hard/District B13; American Psycho/Repulsion; Dumb and Dumber/Too Late For Tears; Get Out/Upstream Color; Galaxy Quest/The Seven Samurai; Face/Off/Mulholland Drive; The Karate Kid/Let the Right One In.

Check out my Script Consultation Services at http://ow.ly/HPxKE. I offer several types of service. Testimonials can be found at the blog entry.

Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay?  Check out the second edition of my screenwriting book, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader published on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GD1XP9Y

Finally, I have published a collection of three of my plays, 3 Plays, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08478DBXF as well as two collections of short stories, The Starving Artists and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FS91CKJ and The Five Corporations and the One True Church and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07KY5Z3CF.

Feeling Trapped: Try Episode 4 of the POP ART podcast-The Great Escape/A Man Escaped


Feeling a bit trapped? Longing to escape? So are the characters in the latest installment of my podcast series POP ART. So what better time to sit down and indulge? The basis of Pop Art is for my guest to choose a movie from popular culture and I will, in turn, chose a film from the more arty/classic side of cinema. This time my guest movierob selected the epic John Sturges WWII prison escape film The Great Escape. I in turn chose the more austere, minimalist Robert Bresson WWII prison escape film, A Man Escaped, both based on true stories. And in this episode we cover such topics as: Did the Simpsons do it? Why was Steve McQueen not chosen most popular actor on the set of The Great Escape? What liberties did the writers take for The Great Escape? Why is anti-cinema at times more emotional than cinema? And what does A Man Escaped have to do with The Incredible Hulk? So come along with us as we explore man in captivity. Don’t forget to leave a comment and follow my podcast. Hear it at https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/hcasner65579/episodes/2020-04-26T11_40_05-07_00 While there, listen to the first three episodes, Raiders of the Lost Arc/The Treasure of the Sierra Madre,  Goldfinger/The Spy Who Came in From the Cold and Monty Python and the Holy Grail/The Seventh Seal.

POP ART 2: Goldfinger/The Spy Who Came In From the Cold


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just to remind everyone, I have now uploaded my second episode for my new podcast POP ART, Goldfinger/The Spy Who Came in From the Cold. You can find it at https://hcasner65579.podomatic.com/. While there, if you haven’t, check out episode one, Raiders of the Lost Ark and The Treasure of the Sierre Madre. The idea behind Pop Art is for my guest to choose a movie from popular culture and then I will choose one with some sort of connection to it from the more artistic side of cinema. For this episode, my guest Richard Kirkham chose the James Bond blockbuster Goldfinger and I, in turn, chose the brooding, dark adaptation of John Le Carre’s spy novel The Spy Who Came In From the Cold. John Le Carre called Bond an “international gangster” and in this episode we answer such questions as: how did the screenwriter resolve a major hole in the original Ian Fleming story; what line from Goldfinger was removed for censorship purposes; can someone actually die from being painted gold; what is an Oskar Werner and would you want to be one; who makes the best spy, Bond, James Bond, or Alec Leamus?

 

Let me know what you think.

The Second Episode of my podcast POP ART is up: Goldfinger/The Spy Who Came in From the Cold


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have now uploaded my second episode for my new podcast POP ART, Goldfinger/The Spy Who Came in From the Cold. You can find it at https://hcasner65579.podomatic.com/. The idea behind Pop Art is for my guest to choose a movie from popular culture and then I will choose one with some sort of connection to it from the more artistic side of cinema. For this episode, my guest Richard Kirkham chose the James Bond blockbuster Goldfinger and I, in turn, chose the brooding, dark adaptation of John Le Carre’s spy novel The Spy Who Came In From the Cold. John Le Carre called Bond an “international gangster” and in this episode we answer such questions as: how did the screenwriter resolve a major hole in the original Ian Fleming story; what line from Goldfinger was removed for censorship purposes; can someone actually die from being painted gold; what is an Oskar Werner and would you want to be one; who makes the best spy, Bond, James Bond, or Alec Leamus?

 

Let me know what you think.

My new podcast POP ART, EPISODE ONE: Raiders of the Lost Ark and Treasure of the Sierra Madre


First a word from our sponsor:

Check out my Script Consultation Services at http://ow.ly/HPxKE. I offer several types of service. Testimonials can be found at the blog entry.

Ever wonder what a reader for a contest or agency thinks when he reads your screenplay?  Check out the second edition of my screenwriting book, More Rantings and Ravings of a Screenplay Reader published on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GD1XP9Y

Finally, I have published a collection of three of my plays, 3 Plays, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08478DBXF as well as two collections of short stories, The Starving Artists and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FS91CKJ and The Five Corporations and the One True Church and other stories, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07KY5Z3CF.

 

I have now uploaded my first podcast for my new show POP ART. You can find it at https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/hcasner65579. The idea behind Pop Art is for my guest to choose a movie from popular culture and then I will choose one with some sort of connection to it from the more artistic side of cinema. My first guest, Donald McKinney, chose the exciting blockbuster Raiders of the Lost Ark. In turn I chose the John Huston/Humphrey Bogart masterpiece, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, both stories about the search for treasure. Have a listen, tell me what you think, feedback is welcome. The first episode is a bit glitchy editing wise, my first effort, but I shall get better.